FROM STAFF REPORTS

Iredell-Statesville Schools officials have been working diligently to identify and notify close contacts of a small number of individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19 at seven district schools this week.

At three other schools, district personnel, working in conjunction with the Iredell County Health Department, determined that individuals who were infected with COVID-19 did not have close contact with any students or employees.

The individuals who have tested positive, along with any close contacts at school, have been instructed by health officials to quarantine at home for up to 14 days.

At each campus that has been impacted by a positive test result, school personnel have provided a deep cleaning following the stringent protocols developed by the Centers for Disease Control and N.C. Department of Health Human Services, school officials said. Electrostatic misters are being utilized at these schools to ensure the virus cannot be contracted by touching surface areas.

Here is a rundown of the schools where an individual tested positive this week:

August 24 

♦ N.B. Mills Elementary: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine until September 8.
♦ Cloverleaf Elementary: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine until September 2.
♦ North Iredell Middle: No close contacts.
♦ CCTL Early College (on Mitchell Community College campus in Statesville): No close contacts.

August 26 

♦ South Iredell High: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine until September 5.
♦ Shepherd Elementary: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine for 14 days.
♦ Third Creek Elementary: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine until September 9.
♦ Third Creek Middle: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine until September 9.

August 27 

♦ Cool Springs Elementary: Close contacts were identified and instructed to quarantine until September 9.
♦ Sharon Elementary: No close contacts.

District officials previously reported positive tests at Third Creek Middle, Lake Norman Elementary, West Iredell High and Crossroads Early College, which is housed on the campus of Statesville High.

I-SS spokeswoman Boen Nutting on Thursday offered praise to district teachers who are working hard under challenging circumstances to ensure students practice social distancing, wear their face coverings and wash their hands frequently.

After Gov. Roy Cooper prohibited schools across the state from opening without restrictions due to public health concerns, the I-SS school board voted to begin the new school year under Plan B, which allows schools to open as long as they can meet state guidelines. As a result, most I-SS students who have not opted to receive only-online instruction are on campus two days each week.

All schools receive a deep cleaning each Wednesday.

COVID-19 is a respiratory virus that can cause a wide range of symptoms that include fever or chills, cough shortness of breath, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea and a new loss of taste or smell. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or can be inhaled into the lungs. COVID-19 can be spread by people who are not showing symptoms. Symptoms may appear from two to 14 days after exposure.

Employees and students should not come to school if they develop any of the above symptoms. Those with symptoms should isolate at home and get tested as soon as possible. Locate testing sites HERE.

3 thoughts on “I-SS working to protect students, employees after positive COVID-19 tests impact 10 district schools this week

  1. No one should be in school. ISS should have tested all employees and children before returning to school if you were going with plan B. Let’s use our thinking instead of allowing the influence of parents in the county. Once everyone test results were in then you make a decision to go with plan b. So you would not have 10 schools with cases.

    • I agree with Tiffany. It’s been two weeks since most schools started, and I’m afraid this is just the beginning. We won’t be able to send kids to school and go back to work for good until we actually deal with Covid-19 and get positive test rates down to CDC-recommended levels. We will end up opening and closing over and over while the risk of more deaths rises. I hope I’m wrong and this isn’t the beginning of a wave. I hope everyone stays healthy. I need schools for daycare like most people, but can we use common sense and look at what has or hasn’t worked around the world and listen to science?

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