The bill helps teenagers who have experienced delays in applying for their licenses due to COVID-19

Special to Iredell Free News

Gov. Roy Cooper on Tuesday signed into law Senate Bill 69, a bill introduced by Sen. Vickie Sawyer (R-Iredell, Yadkin) aimed at helping teenagers who have had to wait extended periods of time applying for their licenses due to COVID. The bill reduces the amount of time an individual needs to have their permit before applying for a Level 2 limited provisional license from 12 to six months.

Specifically, Senate Bill 69 allows a person who is at least 16 years old, but less than 18 years old to obtain a limited provisional license (Level 2) if the person meets all of the following requirements:

♦ Has held a limited learner’s permit issued by the Division for at least six months;
♦ Has not been convicted of a motor vehicle moving violation or seat belt infraction or a violation of G.S. 20- 137.3 during the preceding six months;
♦ Passes a road test administered by the Division;
♦ Has a driving eligibility certificate or a high school diploma or its equivalent;
♦ Has completed a driving log, on a form approved by the Division, detailing a minimum 60-hours as the operator of a motor vehicle of a class for which the driver has been issued a limited learner’s permit. The log must show at least 10 hours of the required driving occurred during nighttime hours. No more than 10 hours of driving per week may be counted toward the 60-hour requirement. The driving log must be signed by the supervising driver and submitted to the Division at the time the applicant seeks to obtain al limited provisional license. If the Division has cause to believe that a driving log has been falsified, the limited learner’s permit holder shall be required to complete a new driving log with the same requirements and shall not be eligible to obtain a limited provisional license for six months.

The act became effective when it was signed into law on May 24, and applies to applicants for licenses submitted on or after that date. The act expires on December 31, 2021.

“I introduced this legislation as a direct result of hearing from parents and families whose teenagers weren’t able to get their licenses on-time due to COVID delays. The passage of this legislation is especially important as teens seek summer employment and need to get to and from work. I’m thankful to the Governor for signing this bill into law today and for all those who supported the bill throughout this process,” said Sawyer.

1 thought on “Gov. Cooper signs into law Sen. Sawyer’s bill to reduce wait time for provisional license

  1. Matt “HASH” Aschbrenner says:

    Six months of driving experience before being turned loose as a driver? Are you kidding?
    One year of experience was bad enough for our teens, getting their permits at 15. As it stands, they have too many distractions to deal with already while being inexperienced and operating a 1500 pound automobile.
    Other states allow teens to start driving with a licensed adult driver (age 25+ yrs) at 14 years of age. That way, they have TWO YEARS of experience driving before they “solo” in a car/truck.
    This is POOR legislation, Senator Sawyer.
    Teenage accidents and fatalities are going to rise just because they’ll only have 60 hours of experience before we put them on the road.
    What were you thinking?

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